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Turkish Uniforms of the Crimean Era: Part 3

Figure 7: Infantryman on the march: a composite of a Vanson drawing entitled 'Constantinople', and a Constantin Guys sketch titled 'Turkish Convoy Guard in Bulgaria'.

Figure 7: Infantryman on the march: a composite of a Vanson drawing entitled 'Constantinople', and a Constantin Guys sketch titled 'Turkish Convoy Guard in Bulgaria'.This type of greatcoat would appear to have been the most commonly used type, judging from the frequency of depiction. It is usually described as of coarse I grey or dark grey wool, trimmed with red tape in much the same fashion as the 'old' jackets. The skirts seem to have been frequently turned-back in the French manner.
The trousers are shaded, presumably dark blue. The Guys figure has his lower legs wrapped in what is described as white material, presumably as protection against the cold. He wears the less frequently seen white crossbelt equipment, with a large dark-coloured pack, approximating more to Western types, with blanket roll strapped to the top.

Figure 8: Infantryman, from an untitled drawing.

Another greatcoat variant, this time a more 'oriental' type with attached hood. No colour description is given, but the greatcoat is shaded much the sameFigure 8: Infantryman, from an untitled drawing. shade as the trousers, and might be dark blue? The irregular patches on the breast are commonly seen on this type of garment and have small bells or tassels descending from chains. The trousers are tucked into heavy ribbed dark-shaded stockings, with short boots laced up the inner side of the shaft.


FIGURE 9: Drummer, from a colour drawing titled 'Turkish Infantry of the Army of Omer Pasha; Crimea, April 1855'.

FIGURE 9: Drummer, from a colour drawing titled 'Turkish Infantry of the Army of Omer Pasha; Crimea, April 1855'.Red fez with dark blue tassel. Dark blue tunic, including all facings, a white tape or piping edging the bottom of the collar, front opening, shoulderstraps, top of the cuffs and only 3 sides of the cuff flaps (the top and front of the collar being piped dark blue), brass buttons. Dark blue trousers tucked into medium brown high gaiters with brown shoes. Black belts with brass plate, the drum bandolier having black drumstick loops. Brass drum with plain brown hoops, white tightener cords and carrying strap. White cravat or neck scarf. An off-white roll strapped to the pack.
This drawing presumably depicts a regimental band, though most of the musicians depicted are drummers. The Drum Major, depicted in 3/4 rear view in the left foreground, has the same white trim on the tunic, including 2 white pipings running vertically from the buttons at the back of the waist to the bottom of the skirts, but has a red piping down the outer seam of the trousers. He is armed with a straight-bladed officer's type sword carried on a frog on a white waistbelt, and carries a leading staff (little of which is visible). This is the only Vanson drawing depicting the 'new' uniform being worn in conjunction with the gaiters; it is also one of the rare instances where the gaiters are depicted with straps under the instep.
Material on musicians is rather limited, but suggests they generally wore much the same uniform as the other ranks, but with some variation in the trim on the jacket or tunic. For example, a rather extended description of a unit wearing the 'old' uniform, with jackets fastened with hooks and eyes, describes their drummers as wearing buttoned jackets with piping down the front opening, a rather broad red tape edging the bottom of the collar and top of the cuffs, with a narrow tape on the remaining edges of both. Drum belts are usually described as white; drum hoops are described as 'normally brown', but occasionally painted in a sawtooth pattern, with the inner triangles blue, the outer ones alternating yellow and red.

Figure 10: Foot Artilleryman, from a black and white sketch titled 'Campaign Artillery'.

This figure wears the rather uncommon buttoned jacket, which appears to be without facings or trim of any kind (since the sketch is unshaded it's difficult to tell for certain). I Figure 10: Foot Artilleryman, from a black and white sketch titled 'Campaign Artillery'.would assume the jacket to be dark blue, while the Western-style trousers might be either dark blue or white. His only armament is a short straight-bladed sword of unknown Western type, which seems to have generally been the norm among dismounted men of the field artillery.

Figure 11: Mounted Artilleryman; a composite from another sketch titled 'Campaign Artillery', and a detailed description of a horse artilleryman on guard duty'.

Figure 11: Mounted Artilleryman; a composite from another sketch titled 'Campaign Artillery', and a detailed description of a horse artilleryman on guard duty'.The horse artilleryman is described as wearing a dark blue jacket with red collar and cuffs (though the sketch appears to show dark blue cuffs edged with red tape the 'rosettes' on the breast are described as being formed of red cord with red pendant tassels. Shoulderstraps are described as dark blue piped red with a button (the sketch figure has unpiped straps apparently sewn down at the collar end). Just below the collar are two brass plates attached to the jacket front; these items appear from time to time in a variety of sources, but their significance is unclear (they seem to occur most commonly on artillery uniforms). Dark blue trousers with a broad red stripe, white belts.
The horse artilleryman is described as carrying a (Western) cavalry sabre and no pouch on guard duty while the sketch shows a pouchbelt and scimitar with steel scabbard. An NCO is mentioned in the horse artillery description as wearing the same uniform as the men with a black waistbelt, new sabre, and no other insignia. Another description of horse artillery mentions brown pointed shabracks edged with blue tape.

Figure 12: From a drawing titled 'Garrison Artillery, Varna' (no colour notes)Figure 12: From a drawing titled 'Garrison Artillery, Varna' (no colour notes)

This figure wears the 'new' uniform with native shoes. The uniform appears identical to that of the infantry, and would presumably have been of the same colours. Curiously, the only part of the drawing to be shaded is the shoulder-straps, which are without piping. Just what this signifies is unclear; might the 'new' artillery uniform have differed from that of the infantry by having differently-coloured shoulderstraps, or could this be simply a peculiarity of Garrison Artillery? He is armed with what appears to be a carbine with bayonet (possibly a French Gendarmerie musketoon?).
A description of a horse artilleryman wear-ing what is presumably the 'new' uniform quotes a dark blue tunic with (dark) blue collar and cuffs, trimmed with red braiding (described as 'less bright than scarlet') and 3 rows of small brass buttons on the breast, dark blue trousers with a broad scarlet stripe, white waistbelt with a square plate, and cavalry sabre without knot.

 

Reproduced from 'Soldiers of the Queen', issue 85

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